Memory Lane: Postcards show the Withams as they were more than 100 years ago

The Fox Inn at South Witham, which remains by the A1. The earliest record of it as an inn is in 1882, when owned by Benjamin Cooper.
The Fox Inn at South Witham, which remains by the A1. The earliest record of it as an inn is in 1882, when owned by Benjamin Cooper.
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Images of North Witham and South Witham dating back more than a century are featured in a new book compiled by a historical society.

Postcards of the Withams, which has been published by South Witham Archaeological Group (SWAG), contains 40 reproduction postcards showing scenes from the two villages.

The school in South Witham opened on April 12, 1880. The schoolmaster's house is on the right, demolished in 2002. The railings were put up in 1880 and are still there to this day.

The school in South Witham opened on April 12, 1880. The schoolmaster's house is on the right, demolished in 2002. The railings were put up in 1880 and are still there to this day.

The oldest ones in the book are dated around 1900, showing the Angel Inn, the parish church, the school in South Witham and assorted views of both villages.

Pete Ball, the group’s treasurer, said: “We’ve been collecting postcards for nearly 20 years and I’ve always said it would be nice to have a book of these old postcards.

“This collection represents only about a half of the ones we have – over the years people have passed them on to us and we have collected some of them ourselves.”

The postcards in the book, which is on sale in the village shop at South Witham, have perforated edges so they can be torn away and used to send to relatives and friends.

Gooseberry Hill in South Witham. The main building is Tanyard House - there are 128 tanpits recorded in the village. The footbridge shows where the RAF bridged the ford in 1942 for access to the bomb dump in Moor Lane.

Gooseberry Hill in South Witham. The main building is Tanyard House - there are 128 tanpits recorded in the village. The footbridge shows where the RAF bridged the ford in 1942 for access to the bomb dump in Moor Lane.

Mr Ball said: “For a small village South Witham has got a lot of postcards and this probably stems from the old railway line.

“People used to come in on the train from Bourne and then get out at South Witham and start taking photographs. In fact, the book has been put together as though you have arrived on the train from Bourne and have then started looking around the villages.”

This is the sixth book produced by SWAG, which was founded 16 years ago to raise awareness of local history, with one of them focusing on the Knights Templar site to the north of South Witham.

High Street in South Witham. Nora Keech ran the shop 1936-1974, before that it was Steel's the butcher (1899-1936). The house to the right is known as the 'Whitehouse'.

High Street in South Witham. Nora Keech ran the shop 1936-1974, before that it was Steel's the butcher (1899-1936). The house to the right is known as the 'Whitehouse'.