Dogs died in agony in Grantham house

Martin Carr leaves Grantham court on Wednesday after admitting causing unnecessary suffering to greyhounds in his care.
Martin Carr leaves Grantham court on Wednesday after admitting causing unnecessary suffering to greyhounds in his care.

FOUR dogs starved to death and two others suffered ‘gross neglect’ at the hands of their owner who left them in atrocious conditions for weeks, a court heard on Wednesday.

Martin Carr admitted 10 charges of causing unnecessary suffering to the greyhounds and failing to ensure their welfare at a house in Harlaxton Road, Grantham.

Beris Brickles, prosecuting, said: “The defendant accepted the dogs were in an atrocious condition.”

RSPCA officers discovered the animals at Carr’s former home on March 14 this year.

Mr Brickles said the four dead dogs, which were found in pens in a padlocked garage behind the house, had suffered for at least three weeks with a lack of food and water.

He said: “There was an overpowering smell of faeces and ammonia. The appalling state of the animals’ coats indicated that they were living in filthy conditions for a considerable time.”

In the first two pens, two dogs called Baby and Sophie were found with no food and little or no bedding. They were very thin and one was covered in faeces.

The next pen, which was also dirty, contained Rambo and Secret, who had died next to each other.

Mr Brickles said: “Again the conditions were appalling. The two dogs found together had ulcers on their body, which suggested they were too weak to stand. They died of starvation unable to get up at all.”

Two live dogs, which had also been left in filthy conditions, were taken by the RSPCA for immediate veterinary care.

Mr Brickles added: “The two dogs were continuing to suffer from gross neglect.”

Both dogs had conjunctivitis, dermatitis and were under weight. One was severely emaciated and estimated to be six kilogrammes under weight.

Carr, who now lives in Park Way, Whitwell, Worksop, had been visited by the RSPCA on several other occasions starting in July 2010 and told to improve their conditions.

Andrew Coley, defending, said it was not a case of deliberate ill treatment but one of neglect.

He said: “He is clearly ashamed by it and very much upset by the whole incident. He had sought no medical advice but it seems to me he was suffering something akin to severe depression. There was a significant family incident relating to a serious criminal offence.

There was overwhelming distress caused to Carr by what happened and the dogs were allowed to fend for themselves. Being fed once every five days led to significant problems.”

Two other adult dogs and seven puppies were also found at the property in reasonable condition.

Carr will be sentenced at on September 21 after reports are completed.