Doctor who was dedicated to Grantham A&E dies in Lincoln Hospital aged 86

Dr Lakshmi Chakrabarti

Dr Lakshmi Chakrabarti

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A doctor who worked at Grantham hospital for 27 years and supported the fight for the A&E department has died, aged 86.

Dr Lakshmi Narayan Chakrabarti became the first consultant in charge of A&E at Grantham in the 1980s. He retired in 1995.

Dr Lakshmi Chakrabarti

Dr Lakshmi Chakrabarti

Dr Chakrabarti died after collapsing on Friday night at his home in Harlaxton Road and was taken to Lincoln Hospital where his family says he died peacefully a few hours later.

Dr Chakrabarti’s wife, Suvra Geeta, said: “He was a very nice man, very kind and would help everybody. He was loved by a lot of people in Grantham. Everybody knew him.”

Mrs Chakrabarti added: “He fought for Grantham Hospital. Ten years ago he took part in the protest march through Grantham. He wrote letters to the Journal about it. So many times he wrote about how people suffered here.”

Dr Chakrabarti leaves a son, Indranil, and two grandsons, Rohan and Luke. The couple’s daughter, Rinku, passed away seven years ago.

The family say they are upset that Dr Chakrabarti had to be taken 30 miles to Lincoln Hospital when the hospital he cared so much about was right here in Grantham. Indranil, a surgeon, said: “The thing that disappoints us is that he could not go to the hospital that he dedicated his life to and had to be taken 30 miles away. He was not able to die in Grantham Hospital in his home town. That would be what he wanted and it’s terrible that it has happened. It would have given him a little bit of dignity for him to go to Grantham Hospital.”

Grandson Rohan added: “Even last month he was writing letters and he would want his last fight to be this.”

Dr Chakrabarti was born in East Bengal. He graduated as a doctor in Calcutta before coming to the UK in 1967. He first worked in Yorkshire before moving to Lincoln and then Grantham where he was a registrar. He achieved a Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh before becoming a consultant at Grantham.

Indranil said he had had a heart condition for many years but was mentally very alert and “bright as a button”. He said: “Grantham adopted him and it was his second home and he was part of the furniture in this town.”

Mr Chakrabarti said his father had been torn between staying in Grantham or going back to live in India.

His family said Dr Chakrabarti enjoyed playing bridge for many years and had played it at the George Hotel. He also played at the Town and Country Club where he was a member. He also liked to have an occasional flutter on the horses.