Old School building given new lease of life at King’s School, Grantham

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An historic building, built in 1497, has been given a new lease of life at King’s School in Grantham and was officially re-opened on Tuesday night.

The Old School building, where Sir Isaac Newton was taught, has been fully refurbished and its Collyweston-tiled roof re-laid at a cost of £270,000.

At the re-opening of the Old School at King's School, Grantham, are, from left - Chairman of the Governors Paul Ross, Chief Executive of the Education Funding Agency Peter Lauener and King's Head Master Frank Hedley. Photo: 095A

At the re-opening of the Old School at King's School, Grantham, are, from left - Chairman of the Governors Paul Ross, Chief Executive of the Education Funding Agency Peter Lauener and King's Head Master Frank Hedley. Photo: 095A

Funding of £238,000 came from the Education Funding Agency and its chief executive, Peter Lauener, was there to unveil a special plaque.

King’s head master Frank Hedley told a gathering of invited guests: “It remains a key building in the life of the school. Although initially used as a school room, in 1906 it was dedicated as the school chapel. In recent times it has been used as a school library, and from September will be used as a flexible teaching space, lecture hall, social space and function room.

“This building is steeped in history. Look around - evidence of boys having left their marks is everywhere – initials, signatures and diagrams are engraved into the stone window sills and surrounds (inside and out).

“As a boy at King’s, Isaac Newton quickly rose to be ‘first’ in the school and allegedly carved his name on every bench that he sat at, and also in the window sill behind me.

“This building is important not only to the history of the school, and for its continued use for educational purposes; it is also a key part of Grantham’s heritage. One only has to look at the collection of surrounding buildings – Grantham House and St. Wulframs - to recognise their innate beauty and historical significance to Grantham, the county, and dare I say to the country as a whole.”

Among the guests at the re-opening evening were the Mayor of Grantham, Coun Frank Turner, Coun Martin Hill, leader of Lincolnshire Coiunty Council and Tony Worth, the Lord Lt of Lincolnshire.

Before unveiling the plaque to commemorate the re-opening of the building Mr Lauener said: “I am very, very pleased we have been able to support this project, not just for King’s but for Grantham itself. It is an inspiring thought to be talking to you in the same building that Isaac Newton was taught.”