Former man from the Pru George turns 100 in Grantham

George Buxton, seated centre, celebrates his 100th birthday at Premier Court with friends and family. Photo: 0270A
George Buxton, seated centre, celebrates his 100th birthday at Premier Court with friends and family. Photo: 0270A

A former man from the Pru who once blocked the Mersey tunnel when he crashed his lorry during the war celebrated his 100th birthday this week.

George Buxton was surrounded by family and friends on Tuesday to mark his 100th birthday. They held a celebratory lunch at Premier Court in Grantham where George now lives.

George was born in Holywell, near Stamford. He left school aged 14 and worked in Seaton and Careby before becoming a hall boy at Stapleford Park.

In 1934, he moved to Burleigh House to work as a footman and met his future wife Jessie, who worked as a housemaid. They were married for 72 years years before she died last year.

George said: “We got together which was never allowed. I was in big trouble!”

In 1937, George became a chauffeur to Kim Muir, an amateur jockey, who prompted George’s lifelong love of horse racing. He married Jessie in 1939 in St John’s Church in Grantham .

George volunteered for the RAF when war broke out and was based in Cambridge and Birmingham. He was also in Coventry when it was badly bombed by the Germans and he was later released to drive the corporation buses. Later in the war, he went to Liverpool to drive transport at Birkenhead docks. While driving, he crashed into the back of another lorry in the Mersey tunnel and it was blocked.

After the war, George drove for Lincolnshire Roadcar. In 1952, he and Jessie moved to Long Bennington and he joined the Prudential Assurance Company as an agent and worked for them until his retirement.

George was invited down to London to two star dinners as one of the company’s top insurance agents.

He and Jessie had three children, Paul, Magdelene and Hannah. Sadly, Paul died in 2001.

The couple moved to Grantham in 1983 to enjoy retirement.

Despite reaching 100, George remains active. He is a member of Grantham Bowls Club and Gonerby Social Club, an honorary member of the Conservative Club and belongs to the Masons.

In his younger days he used to play football for Stamford Town Reserves and he also enjoyed racing greyhounds at Long Bennington.

George has seven grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren.

Leading such a busy life, George says, with a smile on his face: “I just keep going!”