Grantham court: Colleague harassed widow with phone calls

Court news.
Court news.

After harassing his work colleague following the death of her husband, a restraining order has been issued against a Grantham father.

Paul Sanderson, 34, of Sidney Street, Grantham pleaded guilty to harassment without violence by making 29 phone calls to a woman he knew through work.

Prosecutor Marie Stace explained that the victim lives in Grantham with her two daughters, and that her husband had recently died.

During this difficult time she became close to the defendant. Despite never telling him where she lived, last year she received messages on her phone from him describing what her house looked like and describing her curtains.

Miss Stace went on to relate how in 2015 the pair’s relationship turned physical, which the victim said lasted only a short time when she was at a low point.

When she decided the relationship should end, she still noticed him around outside of work and also at the park with his daughter while she was out with her children.

Following her husband’s death, the victim arrived at home on April 20 in her car and noticed there was a man standing in the alleyway near her house.

She ran inside and at this point didn’t ring the police, unitl it happened again and she also started receiving calls from a blocked number, usually late at night or in the early hours, which she refused to answer.

On April 27 she received two voicemails, from a male voice she recognised as Sanderson’s, the first of which she reported said something similar to ‘I know what you have done’ and the second just saying ‘die’.

Frightened, the victim called the police, but continued to receive calls from a blocked number on May 2, 3, 4 and 14 as well as a text message which wished her well. Although this text was also anonymous she guessed it was from Sanderson from the term he used to refer to work.

In a victim statement she said she lived in fear of Sanderson, and didn’t feel that she could go out by herself because she was constantly looking over her shoulder.

She even installed CCTV and extra security outside her property, and added that it was already a difficult time for the family after the death of her husband and also her father.

When Sanderson was arrested he admitted that he had continued to call her using 141 to block his number, despite receiving a warning notice from police.

Representing himself in court, he accepted the description of events, apart from the content of the voicemails which he said didn’t include anything malicious. He added that he was contacting her to try and clear the air because of them both working together.

Magistrates imposed a restraining order lasting two years, prohibiting Sanderson from contacting the victim in any way, execept communication made solely in relation to work during working hours.

He must also pay a £200 fine, £20 victim surcharge and £85 in prosecution costs.