Grantham Journal letter: Was it right to axe trees?

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I’m writing to say that for once I agree with our local MP. In his column headed ‘We must insist the town becomes greener as it grows’ (Journal, November 30) it contains the paragraph ‘We must insist that they include parks and allotments and lots of trees.’

Fine sentiment, lots of trees, but what about the ones we already have or should I say did have.

One quiet Thursday afternoon was disturbed by the sound of a chainsaw being started (always puts me on edge but that’s a different story). It looked like they were pruning the lovely cherry tree at the bottom of the road. Fair enough, it’s not been done for a number of years. Ten minutes later the chainsaw is still going. I take a look and see they’ve cut the whole tree down, leaving just a large stump and I’m too late to stop the destruction of this fine tree.

Why has this happened to a mature tree that’s been there at least 30 years, and has left a stump over two feet in diameter? Too close to nearb buildings? No, nearest is over 30ft away. Too close to other trees? No, nearest is over 50ft away. Roots to shallow for tree? Showing no signs of this. Tree diseased? I’m no expert, but it was full of leaves until natural fall and had the usual full blossom.

The absence of a yellow warning notice gave no chance of a compromise, a second opinion or a preservation order. A similar tree at the top of the road suffered the same fate and if many more are cut down they will have to rename my street.

Would this have been allowed to happen in certain other towns in South Lincolnshire? This follows the loss of the willow trees on Harlaxton Road and the row of mature trees on Springfield Road. Greener town?

Since I have lived here it has always been a bus route, a single decker bus route, but recently a company has been running double deckers on a regular basis. Coincidence maybe, but it would have been very difficult if the trees were still there. What do you think?

Chris McDonald

Denton Avenue, Grantham