Grantham roadshow to advise people on signs of cancer

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A roadshow asking people to Be Clear on Cancer will be visiting The George Centre in Grantham on Monday and Tuesday.

The event will raise awareness that tummy troubles lasting for three weeks or more could be a sign of cancer and diagnosing it early makes it more treatable.

In South Kesteven around 850 people are diagnosed with cancer each year and around 360 people die of the disease. The roadshow, which is part of a wider campaign launched by Public Health England in the Midlands, will encourage anyone suffering from symptoms such as persistent diarrhoea, bloating or discomfort in the tummy area, to see their doctor. These problems can be a sign of a number of different cancers, such as bowel, ovarian or pancreatic.

Campaign information leaflets will be distributed and a nurse will be on hand to talk to anyone who has any questions.

Around nine in 10 cases of cancer are diagnosed in people aged 50 or over and the earlier it is diagnosed, the greater the chances of survival. Raising awareness is crucial, as a recent survey in the Midlands shows that only one in six over 50s would see their GP if they felt bloated for more than three weeks and only one in four would go to the GP if they had experienced discomfort in the tummy area for over three weeks.

Furthermore, the survey found many residents are concerned that they would be wasting their GP’s time if they went to see them about such problems.

Ben Anderson, Deputy Director for Healthcare at Public Health England, East Midlands, said: “Our survey shows that many over 50s in the Midlands would be worried about wasting their doctor’s time if they had diarrhoea, bloating or discomfort for three weeks or more. But persistent tummy troubles such as these could be a sign of cancer and people should be encouraged to see their GP.

“The Be Clear on Cancer roadshow events are a fantastic opportunity for people to speak to the team and find out more.”

For further information about possible signs of cancer, visit www.nhs.uk/tummytroubles.