Grantham Rotarians plant crocuses at Harlaxton Manor ready for World Polio Day

Grantham Rotarians have planted crocuses at Harlaxton Manor in the lead up to World Polio Day.
Grantham Rotarians have planted crocuses at Harlaxton Manor in the lead up to World Polio Day.
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The Rotary Club of Grantham, along with thousands of Rotary clubs across the globe, is marking historic progress towards a polio-free world by planting 
crocuses leading up to World Polio Day on October 24.

Members of the Rotary Club of Grantham have been busy planting 10,000 crocus bulbs at Harlaxton Manor with the help of students from America.

Since Rotary and its partners launched the Global Polio Eradication Initiative nearly 30 years ago, reports of polio have plummeted by more than 99.9 per cent, from about 350,000 cases a year in 125 countries to just 37 cases in the three remaining polio-endemic countries, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria, in 2016.

Geoff Turner, president of the Rotary Club of Grantham, said: “I am delighted for the club to be involved in this project and thank Harlaxton College for their support, allowing bulbs to be planted at the front gates and also in front of the manor itself.”

Rotarians across Britain and Ireland are also lighting up iconic buildings purple and holding other events for World Polio Day, as part of Rotary International in Great Britain and Ireland’s Purple4Polio campaign.

Purple is the colour of the dye placed on the little finger on the left hand of a child to show they have been immunised against polio, hence the name Purple4Polio. With millions of children to vaccinate, this makes it easier to see who has been protected and who has not.

Rotary has contributed more than US$1.7 billion to ending polio since 1985, including over US$1 million from the Rotary Global Swimarathon organised by the Rotary Club of Grantham between 2012 and 2017.