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Diamond couple from Bottesford keep up family traditions

Betty and Keith Samuel reached their diamond anniversary yesterday.

Betty and Keith Samuel reached their diamond anniversary yesterday.

After her parents marked their diamond anniversary in the Journal, Betty Samuel and her husband Keith have celebrated their own this week.

The couple were married at St Mary’s in Bottesford on August 14, 1954, before spending their honeymoon in Skegness.

Keith, aged 82, remembers: “The first time I saw her I was tipping a load of tarmac in North Crescent. I thought ‘she looks a bit of alright’.”

Fortunately for Keith as he knew the boyfriend of Betty’s sister Joan he was able to arrange a double date, and they often went out together as a four to the cinema.

Betty, aged 85, jokes: “He’s my toy boy”, and it seems that she was also impressed by the time he had spent in the army prior to their meeting.

Keith started his service in 1949 and following training was posted to Monstadt in Germany where he drove tanks.

On his return in 1952 he worked for his father’s haulage contractor company before moving on to drive for the firm John Lee, besides helping to lay many of the paths and roads in and around Bottesford.

The village has always been home to Keith as it has been for generations of his family, with his grandfather owning the old grocers, and the couple now live on School View just around the corner from where they first met.

While Keith, like his ancestor, enjoys growing vegetables in the garden, Betty has kept up another family tradition.

She said: “My parents were married for 65 years before my mother died, and their golden wedding and diamond wedding were both in the Journal.”

The Samuels have three sons, Christopher, Roger and Nicholas, and four grandchildren, Rachel, James, William and Jake.

Asked what the secret of their long marriage was, Betty said: “We say what we think of each other,” before adding, “He thinks he is the boss and I think I’m the boss.”

However in the end this clearly doesn’t matter, as Betty concludes: “We do everything together.”

 

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