DCSIMG

Grantham’s Gravity Fields is chance for schools to boost curriculum

Gravity Fields

Gravity Fields

Some of the UK’s top scientists and science organisations are offering exciting events and workshops for students aged 11-18 at this September’s Gravity Fields Festival, alongside a busy primary programme.

For secondary students there are numerous events which focus on the physical sciences, including astronomy, physics, and materials science.

The programme also includes events on medicine, geography, and climate science, and there are theatre shows, exhibitions and heritage events from national arts organisations.

The festival is now taking bookings for secondary schools visits. Linked closely with the Key Stage curriculums, over 30 dedicated events will be held for 11- to 18-year-olds to capture the imagination of students between Wednesday. September 24. and Friday. September 26.

Booking for schools and group discounts need to be made through The Guildhall Arts Centre on 01476 406158 and can only be made via phone for half-day or full-day packages. Individual events for smaller groups can be booked online. The education visits programme can be downloaded at www.gravityfields.co.uk and individual event details found on the daily events calendar on the website.

Specialist workshop 
events include:

24-28 September daily

* A science fair daily in The George Centre – free for students and public, to include touring science exhibitions from the Universities of Newcastle, Hull, Leicester and Lincoln, and science organisations such as Raspberry Pi.

* International Exhibition of Science Photos exhibition – Grantham Museum

* Volatile Light (arts exhibition) – Market Stores, Conduit Lane.

Other highlights include

Wednesday September 24:

* Weighing the Planets is a Key Stage 4 workshop with Dr Catherine Heymans from the Institute of Astronomy, University of Edinburgh. In this workshop students will measure the size and mass of the Earth and Moon, using data from as early as 240BC. Dr Heymans would particularly like to encourage science groups, including girls, to come to this workshop, although it is open to all Key Stage 4 students.

* Climate Change – Students are offered the opportunity to hear how ships logs from past centuries are leading to new discoveries, attend a debate on Engineering the Climate and hear from the BBC Head of Weather.

Thursday September 25:

* Materials in Action workshop is led by the international Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining which has its HQ in Grantham. This interactive presentation shows how materials have helped to improve the technology we rely on in computers, aircraft, sports equipment and medical devices. Separate sessions are held for Key Stage 3, 4 and 5 age groups.

* Professor Peter Vukusic from the University of Exeter presents the Light Fantastic: the science of light and colour. This engaging seminar will enhance students’ understanding of the science of light and colour. It focuses on the perspectives of biology, physics and chemistry and the important principles of light and colour for plants, animals and human technology. Ages 14-18. Also available is an intriguing Colour Experiments demonstration.

Friday September 26:

* Astronomy - Explore the universe through free astronomy workshops and feeds from Las Cumbres robotic telescopes, to be held at Harlaxton Manor led by Dr Chris Lintott of BBC Sky at Night with astronomers from the University of Oxford and University of Cardiff – Ages 14 to 18.

* Medicine - The Death of An Astronaut - a Virtual Autopsy Event – with pathologist Dr Suzy Lishman examining what happens to the body in space is for all secondary age groups. Students can also learn about the history of radiology including Marie Curie from UCL Professor Gary Royle from 14+.

* CERN Live - There’s also the great opportunity for students of all age groups to visit an exhibition about CERN and the Large Hadron Collider and hear from live from the people who work there. Secondary sessions for all ages in the afternoon (primary groups in the morning).

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page