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‘I still want justice for my murdered son’ says father of Grantham man

Tony Corley and the book he has written about his son Mark who was murdered in 2000. Photo: 0255A

Tony Corley and the book he has written about his son Mark who was murdered in 2000. Photo: 0255A

The father of a young man who was shot dead 14 years ago has republished a book he wrote about the case in the hope that his son will still get justice.

Tony Corley first published the book, More Questions than Answers?, in 2009. It tells of his frustrations and his shattered life following the death of his 23-year-old son Mark, who lived in Grantham.

Mr Corley says his life was destroyed when Mark was killed and is never likely to be the same again. Mark was taken to a field in County Durham and shot. His body wasn’t found for another five months.

Mr Corley, 62, of Leicestershire, said: “My hope is still that a person out there will come forward with information to give the police enough evidence to bring Mark’s murderers to justice so they can take their punishment. How can these people live with what they have done?”

In a startling move in 2001, a judge threw out the case against five suspects after it was discovered police had illegally bugged their conversations with solicitors.

Mr Corley said: “I am still very angry and my life will never be the same. It changes you and it changes your family. It hurts when I see other people out there when they get justice and they still moan it was never enough. I do agree if the judge was too lenient, but at least they got some kind of justice. I have never got any kind of justice for my son. I don’t think this is jealousy. It’s anger.

“It’s painful enough losing a child who was lost for six months before being found and going through all that trauma. But it never even got to trial. We were not given that justice. I hope to have justice and hope that someone will come forward and they can get the case re-opened again.

“The police are not investigating any more. I have written to the police umpteen times to get the case reviewed but I do not think they are doing anything.”

Mr Corley says he has his “off days” and that he can be depressed and traumatised. He said: “It changes your life completely. You have to learn to relax and chill out. But sometimes I can’t even watch the news because I know there’s a lot of nastiness out there and if it’s on TV it’s going to upset me.

“I want to move and and hopefully help other people. My main focus is to get justice for Mark.”

Mr Corley has updated the book since it was last published five years ago and has included stories of people he has met who have been through similar cirucmstances to himself.

Proceeds from the sale of the book go to Understand, a voluntary helpline he runs for parents who have lost children through murder or manslaughter (Tel: 07775 471039).

Mr Corley’s book is available from Amazon, priced £7.99, and should be available as an e-book soon.

 

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