Major repairs to Grantham church’s stained glass window begin

Repairs to the west window of the south aisle at St Wulframs Church are expected to cost �80,000.
Repairs to the west window of the south aisle at St Wulframs Church are expected to cost �80,000.

Repairs to the west window of the south aisle at St Wulfram’s Church began on Monday – expected to cost £80,000.

The repairs are needed because of significant cracks in each of the four vertical mullions that hold the upper rose window section in place.

Damage to the window at St Wulfram's Church, Grantham

Damage to the window at St Wulfram's Church, Grantham

The stone window is some 160 years old and is a Victorian replacement of the medieval window built in the early 14th century. The Victorian window was erected in 1855 for Elizabeth Bradley, a widow, in memory of her husband Richard Bradley, a Grantham businessman, and his family.

John Manterfield, chairman of the St Wulfram’s Church fabric committee, said: “This urgent work will involve the erection of scaffolding to the outside and inside of the window and a protective hoarding around the external scaffold. The glazing of the window will be temporarily replaced by secure wooden panels and sections of the damaged stonework will be carefully replaced to match the original with the weight of the upper stonework supported by the interior and exterior scaffold.”

Access to the church, including the office, toilets and belltower, will be maintained during the works and weekly services will continue as normal.

The repairs will continue until at least November and possibly through to Christmas. They are essential to prevent further damage and ensure the window’s longer-term stability, said John.

A £7,000 grant from the Marshall’s Charity in London has been awarded towards the £80,000 project. Further grants are being applied for but the church is also appealing for donations.

“All donations to the St Wulfram’s fabric fund will be much appreciated,” John added.

The works are being undertaken by Midland Stonemasonry based in Loughborough and will be supervised by church architect, Peter Rogan, from Nottingham.