Peter Clawson’s column: A world without cash?

Peter Clawson.
Peter Clawson.
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Local monetarists have recently accused me of hating fat cats because I am jealous of them.

Not true! It is really because I know what a wonderful planet the earth would be without them. I wonder whether readers have ever considered what it would be like to live in a world without money?

An end to civilisation as we know it but not in the disastrous way current financial experts would have us believe. The exact opposite in fact.

For many years I have studied what might happen if, as I predicted, money outlived its usefulness.

Everyone but the fat cats would benefit enormously. There would be an end to poverty, hunger, most crime and corruption, even global climate change. We would all be able to have whatever we wanted for free within reason and on a first-come-first served basis.

Even though we would all still have to work, it would be to help ourselves and others to make a better world to live in and we would be able to do so for a lesser number of working hours.

Without the need to line the pockets of non-participant shareholders, natural resources would be used up at a slower rate, conditions of employment could be more favourable to workers. Environmental issues would be reduced.

Progress would not be controlled by whether we could afford it or not, although most activities would change very little, as without the need to make ever bigger profits for the non-contributors, production could proceed relatively unhindered.

‘Haves and have-nots’ would be a thing of the past; Garden of Eden’ and ‘Utopia’ would cease to be unreachable dreams and the human race would at last be on the verge of paradise on earth.

Or is it all simply a piece of pie-in-the-sky on my part? The verdict is, as always, yours.