A trip down memory lane following Journal article

0
Have your say

YOU recently requested information on people who, as very young children, used the Wyndham Park Day Nursery.

Well, my two younger brothers both went there in the 1940s as I and my older brother took them there on many occasions at that time.

By coincidence, my youngest brother Alan actually lives within 200 yards of that establishment, in Belton Lane.

I think this would have been around 1948/49 period as I was born in 1939 and my older brother in 1938 and we both would have been at the Huntingtower Road School and later at Spitalgate School, based in Stonebridge House.

We then took them to the other day nursery in Avenue Road. I hope this fleshes out the Wyndham Park records.

Two other reasons for writing are, one I remember being taken to the British Restaurant based in the now defunct Finkin Street Chapel and the other involves Brewery Hill, where we lived.

Brewery Hill, Rycroft Street, Norton Street and Commercial Road got hit by a stick of bombs in the 1940/41 time. This left a large piece of waste ground between our street and Commercial Road and for several years there was an extra water supply tank placed in the middle of it.

The Brewery Hill gang later used the cleared space for our bonfires in November. Another extra water supply tank was on the Hillside above New Beacon Road.

Too young to remember being bombed, we grew up around the wrecked maltings near St John’s Church and bombed out properties in Commercial Road and Rycroft Street.

It seems odd to me that the former Mowbrays Brewery is still there between Brewery Hill and Commercial Road as it and the Old Maltings are a blot on the landscape.

St John’s Church used to be sandwiched by Ruston and Hornsby and Lee and Grinlings Maltings, only the Spitalgate Magistrates Court in London Road sweetened the view.

London Road was never a lovely area but with its football field and trees it was more attractive than now.

Grantham High Street as I remember it had three cinemas, of which The State Cinema, later The Granada, had a mirrored entrance hall which could take two queues out of the rain. It also had an upstairs restaurant and cafe for the more wealthy. Oddly we had few material possessions then but in a way we were happier.

COLIN H. DULLER

West Harnham, Salisbury