Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Churchyard to grow wild to boost wildlife and protect environment in Stoke Rochford near Grantham




A village church will allow part of its churchyard to grow wild in an effort to become more eco-friendly and to protect the wildlife.

A group of green-fingered volunteers planted 700 wildflowers, of five different species, in parts of the churchyard at St Andrew and St Mary’s Church, Stoke Rochford, on Saturday (September 11).

The Rev Neil Griffiths, rector of the Colsterworth Group of Churches, is spearheading the environmentally-friendly campaign.

Volunteers planted wildflowers at Stoke Rochford Church. (51214439)
Volunteers planted wildflowers at Stoke Rochford Church. (51214439)

He said: “Church communities across the country are responsible for many old and historic buildings and with this responsibility often comes responsibility for a churchyard or burial ground.

"This is especially true in our part of rural Lincolnshire, where many churches have ancient lands that have seen the burial of the dead for many hundreds of years.

“Church communities across the country are being encouraged to look after these spaces in a better and more eco-friendly manner, a way that better helps the environment.

Volunteers planted wildflowers at Stoke Rochford Church. (51214449)
Volunteers planted wildflowers at Stoke Rochford Church. (51214449)

"In order to do this, we are leaving areas of the churchyard to become wilder and less manicured, which in turn we hope will lead to increases in bees and other species of wildlife, which are all important to all our health and wellbeing.”

The majority of efforts will be focused more on the older and more remote areas of the graveyard and where the graves are less often visited by members of the public.

Rev Griffiths added: “Because churchyards and burial grounds are important to many people, especially the relatives of those buried there, the areas chosen will be those that are less often visited, in out of the way spots and where the burials are much older.

“We will also ensure that there are signs letting visitors know what is happening and why, so that no one thinks we have stopped caring.

“We hope the flowers will be in full bloom by next year and increased bee and wildlife activity will be much in evidence.”



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More