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Fostering in Lincolnshire: Foster carers needed for children and young adults


By Grantham Reporter


SPONSORED EDITORIAL

With thousands of children still in need of long-term homes, the demand for long-term foster carers continues to be a high priority for councils across the UK.

Fostering gives children the chance to live, thrive and grow up in a safe, stable, and loving family home and Lincolnshire County Council is not standing idle when it comes to helping those children find their way through life.

Just like the many other counties, there are plenty of children and young adults in Lincolnshire, including groups of brothers and sisters, currently waiting for loving homes and families.

Fostering gives children the chance to live, thrive and grow up in a safe, stable, and loving family home.
Fostering gives children the chance to live, thrive and grow up in a safe, stable, and loving family home.

According to the UK charity Family Lives, there are just over 6,000 children in need of a foster home every year throughout the country. Many of these children are unable to return to their birth families because it would not be safe for them to do so.

Many of these children have brothers and sisters who they need to be placed with. They also come from a variety of different ethnic and religious backgrounds and some may have disabilities or other additional needs.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT FOSTERING AT LINCOLNSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

All foster carers approved by Lincolnshire County Council will receive local support including a supervising social worker who will offer guidance.
All foster carers approved by Lincolnshire County Council will receive local support including a supervising social worker who will offer guidance.

What’s the difference between fostering and adoption?

An adoption order ends a child’s legal relationship with their birth family whereas a foster carer is not the legal guardian of the child or young person.

The legal guardianship remains with the birth parents and/or the local authority.

Being brought up in one foster family, often over several years, gives young people in foster care more consistency, and a greater sense of belonging within a family unit.

They can then begin to flourish and be better prepared for adulthood.

The benefits to long-term fostering are not just for the children and young people who gain the stability of living in one family home for the reminder of their childhood. It can also be an incredibly rewarding experience for foster families.

Although there may be some challenges for long-term foster carers, there are also advantages such as watching the children in their care develop and flourish into young adults and knowing they had a big part to play in that.

Many of the children have brothers and sisters who they need to be placed with.
Many of the children have brothers and sisters who they need to be placed with.

Do I qualify as a long-term foster carer?

Each application will be considered on an individual basis and applicants will be considered regardless of gender, marital status, sexuality, employment status, ethnicity or religion.

There are, however, certain requirements.

The carer must ensure a spare bedroom for the foster child or young person to use, prior to the application.

Candidates with criminal cautions or convictions for offences against children, or sexual offences against an adult, will not be considered.

Smokers, including e- cigarettes, will not be able to foster a child under the age of 5 years.

Couple candidates need to have lived together for a minimum of 18 months before their application will be considered.
CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT FOSTERING AT LINCOLNSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

There are just over 6,000 children in need of a foster home every year throughout the country.
There are just over 6,000 children in need of a foster home every year throughout the country.

As a foster carer, what kind of support will I get?

All foster carers approved by Lincolnshire County Council will receive local support including a supervising social worker who will offer guidance and there are also regular support groups on hand.

In terms of allowances, each foster carer will receive an allowance depending on the age of the child while long-term foster carers may also receive an enhanced allowance if they are linked with a child who has been waiting for a permanent placement for over six months.

A total of 14 nights of respite per year is also provided.

There is also no shortage of training and development opportunities for foster carers and that includes membership to the UK’s leading fostering charity – the Fostering Network.

The Fostering Network offers advice and information on a range of issues including income tax and finance, legislation and contact visits.

According to government figures from 2018, over 65,000 children live with almost 55,000 foster families across the UK each day.
According to government figures from 2018, over 65,000 children live with almost 55,000 foster families across the UK each day.

Additional training is also provided to help prepare long-term foster carers for the role of looking after a child or young person on a long-term basis.

Apart from support, there are also reward days arranged for foster carers as a gesture of appreciation which in the past have included three-course silver service meals as well as discounted beauty treatments.

Other benefits include an annual BBQ in the summer and Christmas parties.

Those interested in becoming a long-term foster carer can visit Lincolnshire County Council’s official website to find out more.

For more information, contact the Fostering Recruitment Team on 01522 554114.



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