Grantham Journal letter: No escape from all the mud-slinging

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Having just come home from a holiday in the USA where their “Presidential primary’ campaigns are in full swing, I thought I could escape all the mud-slinging — what the Americans politely call “political bull-feathers”. No such luck.

The British mudslinging and “political bull-feathers” is still very much in evidence vis-à-vis our forthcoming EU referendum.

John Andrews is essentially correct when he says that both in and out campaigners are using scare tactics; however he rather weakens his case when he tries to demolish not one, but two “most” important claims by the “Leave” campaign.

Sovereignty in the current context simply means giving the UK the status of an independent state and while John’s tirade about “elites” might apply to unelected political appointees like the European Commissioners, it ignores the true elites - the most gifted, talented people in any community such as scientists, doctors, entrepreneurs, both economic and cultural, who improve our quality of life.

To describe Britain, the fifth largest economy in the world, as an “economic minnow” is a grotesque distortion of reality; our balance of trade with the EU clearly shows that they need us more than we need them and we also successfully trade on a world-wide basis with Commonwealth and other countries.

Finally, on the subject of scare tactics, John really goes over the top when he suggests that if Britain leaves the EU it could lead to another European war and even another world war – conveniently ignoring the fact that it was not the formation of the EU in 1993, but the creation of NATO in 1949 that has given us almost 70 years of peace.

The truth is that the abject failure of the Euro currency project is creating far more political tension between rich and poor EU countries than Britain’s exit ever could.

Those leading the remain campaign, eg Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, George Osborne are no doubt hoping for some cushy job in Europe when they, or the public, decide it’s time for them to leave the British political scene.

Brian Bruce

Colsterworth