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Lincolnshire health bosses nervous about impact of impending Nottinghamshire lockdown




Health bosses in Lincolnshire say they're 'nervous' about the impact of the impending Nottinghamshire lockdown.

Nottinghamshire is set to go into “level two” lockdown from Wednesday, October 14, and there will be some implications for Lincolnshire as their neighbours.

Leaked documents indicate the lockdown will be announced on Monday, as the city has the fourth highest infection rates in England.

Coronavirus
Coronavirus

The rate of infection for Nottingham currently is 496.8 per 100,000, after cases increased from 314 in the week up to September 27 to 1,654.

Nationally, the rules are also understood to be changing, so that all areas will come under one of three alert levels — with level three for the areas with the toughest restrictions.

Worst case scenarios could see residents ordered not to have social contact with anyone outside their household, while pubs, restaurants and other leisure facilities could be closed in order to combat the spread of coronavirus.

Health bosses in Lincolnshire do not expect the county to need more regulations than those in place nationally on the level one tier.

However, on Wednesday they admitted they’re “nervous” about the situation in Nottinghamshire, which borders the county to the west for almost 50 miles.

Many residents in Lincolnshire commute across the border for work or leisure.

The new rules which have been seen by Nottinghamshire City and County leaders show that people can still go on holiday outside of their area – but only with people they live with or have formed a bubble with.

Meeting people from other households would also be banned and visiting indoor hospitality, leisure and retail settings will be restricted to one household.

Many northern areas of England are already covered by tighter restrictions, including Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds.

Government officials have not confirmed the new rules yet, while housing secretary Robert Jenrick said a “range of different options” were still being explored.



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