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Thanks to Grantham Sunrise Rotary the town will be more colourful than ever next spring


By David Parker


Members of Grantham Sunrise Rotary plant spring bulbs
Members of Grantham Sunrise Rotary plant spring bulbs

Come next spring, Grantham will be brighter and more colourful than ever, thanks to the green-fingered Grantham Sunrise Rotary Club.

In the coming months, members of the town’s youngest Rotary club will be planting a whopping 14,000 bulbs.

Members of Grantham Sunrise Rotary plant spring bulbs
Members of Grantham Sunrise Rotary plant spring bulbs

Work started at the weekend, with 500 daffodils and 2,000 purple crocuses being planted in Abbey Gardens, off St Peter’s Hill. This was followed by the planting of 800 daffodils on the bank of the River Witham, in the area across from the boating lake.

Next weekend will see 8,000 crocus bulbs being planted on the corner of Manthorpe Road and Belton Lane, to complete a planting project started a few years ago by the Rotary Club of Grantham.

Other areas earmarked for a splash of colour are North Parade and Gonerby Hill Foot, where 2,000 crocuses will be dug in, and areas around pathways on the Barrowby Road roundabout, where 1,000 daffodils will spring up.

Sunrise president Andre Finney said: “When we started our club we set out to do projects for the town and, whilst there are pockets of colour in the town at spring-time, we wanted to add more and gradually enhance this on an annual basis.”

The purple crocuses are a symbol of Rotary’s worldwide project to end polio
Andre Finney

The purple crocus flower has been chosen by the club as it is a symbol of the Rotary movement’s ‘End Polio Now’ project, which has had huge success. The worldwide project aims to eradicate the serious viral infection.

Over the last 18 months, ‘End Polio Now’ has taken great strides forward, as in March last year, south-east Asia was certified as polio-free, thanks in large part to the work Rotary carries out to vaccinate. According to Rotary, this milestone means that 80 per cent of the world’s children now live in polio-free regions.

“The purple crocuses are a symbol of Rotary’s worldwide project to end polio,” explained Andre. “When large-scale immunisation programmes take place in India the children have a splash of purple dye on a little finger to show they have been immunised.”

He went on to thank the county and district councils, Wyndham Park Forum, Glendale and the Gedney Bulb Company for their support of the the project.

Members of Grantham Sunrise Rotary plant spring bulbs
Members of Grantham Sunrise Rotary plant spring bulbs


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